Tag Archives: History

Dis-Criminal Hate: Discrimination based on sexual orientation an issue in Moscow, on campus; new city code targets housing, employment instances

By Jonathan Gradin

That’s so gay.

This and similar idiomatic expressions can be overheard in average conversations, yet many people don’t realize these are a type of discrimination, called micro-aggressions by counselors and the LGBTQA community. Such discrimination has real and serious effects, which are often overlooked or disregarded in a conservative state such as Idaho.

“Usually, what I see is a kind of covert or indirect discrimination,” said Dan O’Donnell, doctoral psychological intern and LGBTQA liaison with the University of Idaho Counseling and Testing Center, who sees “quite a few” such cases. “This can come across in the form of looks or glances that are uncomfortable for the person receiving them, or more verbal micro-aggressions. Specifically with LGBTQ individuals, they often hear the phrase ‘Well, that’s so gay,’ …that type of phrasing suggests that being gay is not what is normal, and so the psychological effects are reinforcing the idea that being gay is not a normal human experience.” Continue reading →

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Preserving a Tradition: Moscow Barber Still Making the Cut After 35 Years

By Jonathan Gradin

The barber shop holds a quintessential place in Americana. From Andy Griffith’s Mayberry to Moscow, Idaho, barber shops functioned as places for men to hang out, share news and keep their hair trimmed. Nowadays, this tradition is gone, save for a few local shops.

“It’s a shame that the tradition of barbers has and is fading away… Traditionally, the barber shops were a place for men to B.S. and get warm by the stove,” said Bill Jones, 71, semi-retired owner of Bill’s Barber Shop on Second Street. It was “sort of a man-cave situation.”

Jones began cutting hair in 1979, when he he sold his convenience store in Calder, up the St. Joe River from St. Maries. He said he was tired of the seven-day-a-week and extra after-hours nature of the store, which robbed him of family time. Continue reading →

A Crash in Time Saves Lives

(Written Feb. 13, 2013, this was a short writing exercise for JAMM-425 Feature Article Writing at University of Idaho.)

By Jonathan Gradin

History student Matt McCune does not fit the traditional image of a priest. The 41-year-old clergyman of the Holy Name of Jesus Anglican Catholic Church resembles a rugged cowboy, with bushy red mustache, long hair tied back and lines of age and experience creasing his face. He wears an informal, black buttoned shirt and a long, gray coat and walks with a well-worn wooden cane.

Yet like the cowboys of olden days, McCune has experienced many trials, including a car wreck in 2008 that had providential implications for this man of faith.

“In April 2008, I had gone to Austin, Texas, ahead of my wife,” McCune Continue reading →